… In Progress

2012

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Pitambar Khan
Untitled

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Pitambar Khan
Untitled

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Pitambar Khan
Carying my bed cover

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Pitambar Khan
Searching for medicine

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Sujit Karmarkar
Insecure -7

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Sujit Karmarkar
Insecure
childhood 1

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Sujit Karmarkar
Floting Utopia

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Shailesh Ojha
Thirsty Dog

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Shailesh Ojha
Cups

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Shailesh Ojha
Journey with Flower

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Kanta Kishore
Newspaper

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Kanta Kishore
Sack with
Golden Chili

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Kanta Kishore
Mythological Book

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Sujit Karmarkar
The Civil carred by the uncivilized

… IN PROGRESS Progress in art does not consist in reducing limitations, but in knowing them better- Georges Braque …In Progress, an exhibition of four young contemporary artists of India– Kanta Kishore Moharana, Pitambar Khan, Shailesh Ojha and Sujit Karmakar who have embarked their engagement with the contemporary through their inventiveness in paintings and sculptures. The group includes two painters- Pitambar Khan & Sujit Karmakar and two sculptors – Kanta Kishore & Shailesh Ojha. These youngsters being from diverse socio political backgrounds and regions, each with their own experiences, concerns and oeuvres have come together with their variable creations in a multitude of styles, materials, techniques and forms to place their unwritten thoughts through their visual articulation. In an imaginative and pragmatic way these young turks have anticipated the social stigma and genuinely put their sheer effort to incorporate it in their art. The works in this exhibition do not provide just a soothing and aesthetically pleasing view rather they provoke the onlookers to find the answers for the questions that the artists have put forth. …In Progress, the artists present a re-interpretation of their own cultural values, political concerns, social ethos, personal dreams and fears in a contemporary context through their art but their process is still evolving and on the verge of progress. Pranamita Borgohain Pitambar Khan has used the truck body, especially the rear side as a base for pouring his vision and beliefs. He feels that this surface carries a whole lot of proverbs, sermons, slogans and figural representations. This also acts as an open book and a carrier of one’s cultural identity giving a clue of their choice, culture, region and religion. These trucks carrying these axioms, motifs and caricatures also act as a medium of cultural exchange and a state of hybridization as they cross the borders. In few of his works he has also tried to address the physically disabled class of our society allegorically representing them as rotten teeth. Sujit Karmakar’s works talk about the disparity between the rich and poor. Interestingly he feels like a sociologist who accepts the fact that for the sustenance of the overall ecosystem of the society the presence of both the classes are vital. However he points out his concerns about the escalating gap that needs to be minimised. He seems like an optimistic person who feels that the red colour which is the sign of danger or to stop, also holds a significant role in the cycle of the life and we do need all sorts of colour to balance our ecosystem. His figures are shrouded in mystery that the artist presents in a photonegative style. Shailesh Ojha’s works address the general issues of human life as love, desire, thirst and hunger. Disturbed by the social violence and turmoil in the city the artist brings the message of love and peace sometimes employing Buddhist ideologies. Playing with the forms and figures on one hand and emotions and expressions on the other , he weaves his composition adeptly using metaphorical idiom. Through his imagery he uncovers the dual nature of the apparent. His works appear to be a blend of human thoughts, dreams and desires, with pain and melancholy on one side and love and cheerfulness on the other. Kanta Kishore represents a global sentiment where he shares cultural spaces but does not accept cultural hegemony. Kanta’s technical skill is commendable and attention to detail is meticulous. His newspaper series carved out of marble is remarkable. Apart from his proficiency over marble he has worked in many different materials as wood, granite, fibre and glass as well .He skilfully weaves together elements from personal memory, socio- cultural ideology and political reality in his works. It seems as if he rejects the idea that art is a mere tool or medium of expression.