“Covid Diaries” 2020

Megha Joshi

15th December 2020

megha-joshi-04

Brinjal Shrine
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-07

While the Onions Pierce, Bougainvillea are Fierce
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-05

Tradition and the Individual Talent
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-06

True Story
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-08

When The Glass is Broken/What good is wine?
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-03

Wasted Love
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-01

Bitter Times
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-02

Papaya Republic
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

megha-joshi-09

Battle Series ( Set of 6)
Size – 12×16 inches
Medium – Watercolour | Colour pencil on paper
2020

“Covid Diaries” from the Studio of Megha Joshi…

“Irrespective of the mediums and spaces available for displaying her works, Megha explores the existence of the females within an apparently liberal but horribly restrictive society.There is no self-righteousness attitude in her works nor does one see a sloganeering feminism in her visual expressions. She positions herself as a witness and a medium. She works through memories and moments that could have the capacity to generate histories.

The latest series of drawings, which she calls ‘unresolved’ both in terms of working and positioning, catches her precarious existence within the home itself where the relationships between herself, her husband, children, pet, books, furniture, fridge, gas stove, vegetables, water in the pipe and so on are brought into focus. She identifies the brittle nature of relationships, the temporarily of churning emotions, practicalities involved in wading through the cascading ordinariness, negotiating the emotional landscapes made askew by the intensifying tragedies around and so on, the present series of drawings comes to us as an effort to see them in humanistic ways rather than something colored by ideologies. Still there is an effort to denude herself and incarnate as a lonely goddess within a familial pantheon”.

Johny ML
2020

Simone de Beauvoir, the century’s most iconic feminist scholar calls the burden of housework on women a ‘Sisyphian torture’. In her book the Second Sex, she says: “Few tasks are more like the torture of Sisyphus than housework, with its endless repetition: the clean becomes soiled, the soiled is made clean, over and over, day after day. The housewife wears herself out marking time: she makes nothing, simply perpetuates the present … eating, sleeping, cleaning – the years no longer rise up towards heaven, they lie spread out ahead, grey and identical. The battle against dust and dirt is never won.”

“One of the strongest feelings I had when lock down began, was of the supremacy of the quotidian. Everything else receded. Ideological thoughts were less useful than recipes. It has been a time of great philosophical introspection and reassessing old paradigms of thinking”.

Megha Joshi | 2020